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Don Jeronimo

Don Jeronimo Stays At an Inn With Don Quixote: When Don Quixote retires to his room, sits down, and begins eating a stew the landlord brings him, he hears, through a flimsy partition [dividing his room with another], discussion of the false sequel of “Don Quixote de la Mancha.”

Don Quixote
Don Quixote Novel

Don Jeronimo Social Rank: We learn that Don Jeronimo and Don Juan “are so high-up that they bring their own cooks, stewards and provisions with them [to the inn].”

Don Jeronimo Discusses the False Sequel of Don Quixote: A man named Don Juan “begs Don Jeronimo [to] read another chapter of the second part of Don Quixote de la Mancha, while dinner is being prepared.” In response, Don Jeronimo asks Don Juan “why [he] want[s] to read all that nonsense, [since] nobody who has read the first part of the history of Don Quixote can possibly derive any pleasure from reading the second part.” In response, Don Juan says that they should read it “because no book is so bad that there isn’t something good in it.” Don Juan continues that what he dislikes most about the second part of Don Quixote “is that it describes Don Quixote as no longer in love with Dulcinea.” When Don Quixote hears this, he jumps up and cries that “if anyone claims that [he] has forgotten or can forget Dulcinea del Toboso, [he] shall, with equal arms, force him to acknowledge that he is very far from the truth, because neither can the peerless Dulcinea be forgotten, nor is Don Quixote capable of forgetting [her].” When Don Jeronimo hears Don Quixote say this he “puts his arms around [Don Quixote’s neck] and says: ‘Neither can [his] presence belie [his] name, nor can [his] name fail to accredit [his] presence [because he is] the real Don Quixote de la Mancha, [his] guide and Don Quixote Narrative lodestar of knight-errantry, in spite and in defiance of the one who has attempted to usurp [his] name and obliterate [his] deeds” by writing a false sequel of [his] history. Then Don Quixote says to Don Jeronimo that “in the little [he has read of the false sequel of “Don Quixote” he has] found three aspects of [Avellaneda’s] work that [is] worthy of rebuke. First, certain statements in the prologue; second, the fact that the language is Aragonese, (because he often omits the article); and third, [that] he blunders and strays from the truth in the most central feature of the whole history, because [Avellaneda] says that [his] squire Sancho Panza’s wife is called Mari Gutierrez, when she is nothing of the sort, but Teresa Panza.” Don Quixote continues that “if someone can make a mistake about such an important matter we can well fear that he is mistaken in everything else that he says in his history.” When Sancho Panza comments that “it is a fine thing in a historian” to get his wife’s name wrong he says that Don Jeronimo should “take another look at the book to see if he has changed [Sancho Panza’s] name too.” Don Jeronimo replies that “from what [he has] heard, [he] must be Sancho Panza, Don Quixote’s squire.” Then Don Jeronimo says that “this novice author doesn’t treat [Sancho Panza] with the scrupulosity [he] displays in [his] person [but rather] as a simple-minded glutton [who is] Don Quixote – California not at all funny, very different than the Sancho [Panza] described in the first part of the history.”

Don Jeronimo Dines with Don Quixote: After Don Jeronimo discovers who Don Quixote is he invites our knight “into [his] room to share their dinner, [because] there [is] no food at [the] inn fit for him to consume.” Don Quixote accedes to this request and has dinner with Don Jeronimo and Don Juan, leaving Sancho Panza alone to eat his stew.

Don Jeronimo Talks About the Jousts in Saragossa: When Don Jeronimo tells Don Quixote that “the new history relates how [he] participates [in the jousts in Saragossa] in [a] riding ring episode depicted without imagination, with [even] poorer mottos and costumes, rich only in absurdities, [Don Quixote says] for that very reason, [he] shall not set foot in Saragossa [but instead attend] other jousts in Barcelona,” as Don Jeronimo suggests.

Don Jeronimo’s Exit: After discussing the false sequel of Don Quixote’s history, Don Jeronimo leaves the inn.

 

The post Don Jeronimo appeared first on Quixotism in Quixotic Novels.

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Originally posted 2019-12-30 13:39:09.