September 26, 2022

Letters Versus Arms Theme in Don Quixote

Letters Versus Arms Theme in Don Quixote

Letters Versus Arms Theme in Don Quixote
Don Quixote Novel

Another major theme of Don Quixote is the nature of letters versus the nature of arms, which Don Quixote speaks of at length in Part I chapter 37, when he delivers a monologue about: brain work versus physical work; the intelligence of a scholar versus the intelligence of a soldier; the hardships of a student versus the hardships of a soldier; the rewards of a scholar versus the rewards of a soldier; and the need for letters versus the need for arms. Basically, Don Quixote argues that a person should not elevate letters over arms on the basis that one requires brain work while the other only requires physical work. Don Quixote further says that soldiers labour as much with their minds as they do a long Themes post from Don Quixote with their bodies because devising strategies and tactics to forestall enemy dangers is an act of understanding in which the body plays no part. In reference to the hardship of a student versus the hardship of a soldier, Don Quixote says that while many students suffer from hunger, cold, and nakedness because they are poor and destitute, there is always someone to give them food or let them sit at the fireplace to take the edge off the cold. What’s more, Don Quixote says that students sleep under a roof at night in winter, whereas militiamen, or warriors, often sleep, in midwinter, on the cold, hard ground, with nothing to warm them but their own breath. And when battle day comes, Don Quixote asserts, that soldiers face the prospect of a debilitating leg or arm injury, or a bullet wound in the temple, since, at every step a soldier risks his life. What dread of poverty, Don Quixote wonders, can afflict the student as much as the fear a soldier feels at the prospect of losing his life? According to Don Quixote, while students suffer from sleepless nights, hunger, nakedness, dizzy spells, indigestion, and other related problems, a soldier experiences this, and survival worries as well. This is why Don Quixote claims that being a good soldier check out Don Quixote blog post to Characters costs more than being a good student since a good soldier suffers all that a good student suffers to a greater degree of magnitude. In terms of the rewards of a scholar versus the rewards of a soldier, Don Quixote says that once students earn their degrees they govern and rule the world from an armchair with: their hunger turned into satiety; their pitching cold turned into cool comfort; their nakedness turned into finery; and their nights shivering on rush mats turned into gentle repose between Holland-cloth and damask. Furthermore, Don Quixote says that it is easier to reward two thousand men of letters with jobs and decent salaries then to pay thirty thousand soldiers fair wages. Don Quixote then concludes that although a soldier’s hardship is much greater his reward is much smaller. As for the need of letters versus the need of arms, Don Quixote argues that while the goal of letters is: to foster human learning; organize distributive justice; interpret and enforce the law; and justly reward men according to their abilities, the goal of arms is peace, which is the greatest good to which men can aspire in life since a system of laws cannot exist without men responsible for: defending nations; preserving kingdoms; safeguarding cities; clearing highways; and patrolling the high-seas. If it were not for arms, Don Quixote thinks that all states, kingdoms, monarchies, and city states would be forever subject to the cruelty and turmoil of war. Therefore, Don Quixote surmises, the goal of arms is nobler than the goal of letters.

During the Captive Captain’s Tale, Judge Viedma says that arms are better than letters since his brother, a soldier, is “stronger and higher-minded” than he is because he choose the honourable and meritorious profession of arms, not letters. To confirm this viewpoint, we are told by the Captive’s Captain’s father that although there are two roads to riches in this world—one letters, the other arms—the courage and determination of the soldier outweighs the resolve and blog post about Novel at Don Quixote purpose of the scholar, since there is nothing more honourable and profitable than serving one’s King and natural master on the field of battle. In a subsequent conversation with Sancho Panza, Don Quixote tells us that while letters have founded more great houses than have arms, those founded by arms have a certain indefinable superiority over those founded by letters, which sets them above the rest. Throughout the narrative, Don Quixote infers that since the sword is mightier than the pen, arms should be given preference over letters. This is why Don Quixote reproaches a Grave Churchman at a Duke’s castle by saying that since he is a man of letters he attacks with the same weapons a woman does, his tongue. Even though the priest, father Pero Perez, is a man of letters and a church graduate, he says that Don Quixote is quite right in esteeming arms over letters.

Another major theme of Don Quixote is the nature of letters versus the nature of arms, which Don Quixote speaks of at length in Part I chapter 37, when he delivers a monologue about: brain work versus physical work; the intelligence of a scholar versus the intelligence of a soldier; the hardships of a student versus the hardships of a soldier; the rewards of a scholar versus the rewards of a soldier; and the need for letters versus the need for arms. Basically, Don Quixote argues that a person should not elevate letters over arms on the basis that one requires brain work while the other only requires physical work. Don Quixote further says that soldiers labour as much with their minds as they do with their bodies because devising strategies and tactics to forestall enemy dangers is an act of understanding in which the body plays no part. In reference to the hardship of a student versus the hardship of a soldier, Don Quixote says that while many students suffer from hunger, cold, and nakedness because they are poor and destitute, there is always someone to give them food or Don Quixote / Themes let them sit at the fireplace to take the edge off the cold. What’s more, Don Quixote says that students sleep under a roof at night in winter, whereas militiamen, or warriors, often sleep, in midwinter, on the cold, hard ground, with nothing to warm them but their own breath. And when battle day comes, Don Quixote asserts, that soldiers face the prospect of a debilitating leg or arm injury, or a bullet wound in the temple, since, at every step a soldier risks his life. What dread of poverty, Don Quixote wonders, can afflict the student as much as the fear a soldier feels at the prospect of losing his life? According to Don Quixote, while students suffer from sleepless nights, hunger, nakedness, dizzy spells, indigestion, and other related problems, a soldier experiences this, and survival worries as well. This is why Don Quixote claims that being a good soldier costs more than being a good student since a good soldier suffers all that a good student suffers to a greater degree of magnitude. In terms of the rewards of a scholar versus the rewards of a soldier, Don Quixote says that once students earn their degrees they govern and rule the world from an armchair with: their hunger turned into satiety; their pitching cold turned into cool comfort; their nakedness turned into finery; and their nights shivering on rush mats turned into gentle repose between Holland-cloth and damask. Furthermore, Don Quixote says that it is easier to reward two thousand men of letters with jobs and decent salaries then to pay thirty thousand soldiers fair wages. Don Quixote then concludes that although a soldier’s hardship is much greater his reward is much smaller. As for the need of letters versus the need of arms, Don Quixote argues that while the goal of letters is: to foster human learning; organize distributive justice; interpret and enforce the law; and justly reward men according to their abilities, the goal of arms is peace, which is the greatest good to which men can aspire in life since a system of laws cannot exist without men responsible for: defending nations; preserving kingdoms; safeguarding according to a Don Quixote blog cities; clearing highways; and patrolling the high-seas. If it were not for arms, Don Quixote thinks that all states, kingdoms, monarchies, and city states would be forever subject to the cruelty and turmoil of war. Therefore, Don Quixote surmises, the goal of arms is nobler than the goal of letters.

During the Captive Captain’s Tale, Judge Viedma says that arms are better than letters since his brother, a soldier, is “stronger and higher-minded” than he is because he choose the honourable and meritorious profession of arms, not letters. To confirm this viewpoint, we are told by the Captive’s Captain’s father that although there are two roads to riches in this world—one letters, the other arms—the courage and determination of the soldier outweighs the resolve and purpose of the scholar, since there is nothing more honourable and profitable than serving one’s King and natural master on the field of battle. In a subsequent conversation with Sancho Panza, Don Quixote tells us that while letters have founded more great houses than have arms, those founded by arms have a certain indefinable superiority over those founded by letters, which sets them above the rest. Throughout the narrative, Don Quixote infers that since the sword is mightier than the pen, arms should be given preference over letters. This is why Don Quixote reproaches a Grave Churchman at a Duke’s castle by saying that since he is a man of letters he attacks with the same weapons a woman does, his tongue. Even though the priest, father Pero Perez, is a man of letters and a church graduate, he says that Don Quixote is quite right in esteeming arms over letters.

 

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Originally posted 2020-01-28 08:55:28.